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Day-long Workshop Highlights Recent Research Using Non-public Data available at Duke

Friday, April 26, 2019
Gale Boyd

Learn more about research opportunities using confidential federal statistical data that is available at Duke University in the Triangle Federal Statistical Research Data Center (TRDC) from researchers using these data.

Keynote Luncheon:

“RDC Data Resources” by Gale A. Boyd, PhD,  – Executive Director of TRDC.

Come for the keynote or plan for the day. Register for the luncheon and for day parking pass at SSRI– Gross Hall.

Morning speakers include talks on health outcomes and policy, based on non-public data for agencies within the Department of Health and Human Services. Afternoon speakers include talks on important demographic trends and changes in the US Economy, based on non-public data from the Census Bureau.

8:30 AM Registration and Breakfast
8:45 AM Introductions and Welcome
9:00 AM Richard Rogers Early Life Mortality in the United States: Insights from the Restricted-Use National Health Interview Survey-Linked Mortality Files University of Colorado
10:00 AM Joseph Lariscy Cigarette Smoking and All-Cause and Cause-Specific Adult Mortality in the United States University of Memphis
11:00 AM James H. Marton The Impact of the Affordable Care Act on Health Care Utilization Georgia State University
12:00 PM Keynote Luncheon: Gale A. Boyd RDC Data Resources Executive Director of TRDC
1:30 PM Bhash Mazumder Intergenerational Income Mobility: Insights from Micro-Data Chicago Federal Reserve
2:30 PM Ted Mouw Native Workers: Evidence using Longitudinal Data from the LEHD University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
3:30 PM Chang-Tai Hsieh Industrial Revolution in Services University of Chicago - Booth GSB
4:30 PM Matthias Kehrig The Micro-Level Anatomy of the Labor Share Decline Duke University

Morning speakers


Richard Rogers: Early Life Mortality in the United States: Insights from the Restricted-Use National Health Interview Survey-Linked Mortality Files

Richard G. Rogers, PhD, is Professor of Sociology and Institute of Behavioral Science Fellow at the University of Colorado Boulder. His research focuses on differences in early life and adult longevity by social relations, demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, health conditions, and health behaviors.

Richard Rogers

Joseph Lariscy: Cigarette Smoking and All-Cause and Cause-Specific Adult Mortality in the United States

Dr. Joseph Lariscy is an Assistant Professor at the University of Memphis, he did his undergraduate at the University of Georgia and received his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Texas at Austin in 2013. Dr. Lariscy was also a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Population Research Institute at Duke University. His research examines racial/ethnic disparities in adult mortality risk and the early-life processes, particularly health behaviors and educational attainment, which engender or exacerbate later-life health disparities.

Joseph Lariscy

James Marton: The Impact of the Affordable Care Act on Health Care Utilization

Dr. Marton is a health economist whose research, which combines theoretical and empirical methods, examines the financing of public and private health insurance programs. His work has been published in such journals as the Journal of Health Economics, the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, the Journal of Urban Economics, Health Economics, the National Tax Journal, Economic Theory, Economic Inquiry, the Southern Economic Journal, Inquiry, and Health Services Research. Dr. Marton is a faculty affiliate of the Georgia Health Policy Center, the Partnership for Urban Health Research, and the W.J. Usery Workplace Research Group.

James Morton

 

Afternoon speakers


Bhash Mazumder: Intergenerational Income Mobility: Insights from Micro-Data

Bhash Mazumder has been serving as the executive director of the Chicago Federal Statistical Research Data Center at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago since 2002. His research has been focused in four areas: 1) intergenerational economic mobility, 2) the long-term effects of poor health early in life 3) black-white gaps in human capital development and 4) issues in household financial debt and decision making. Mazumder’s research has been published in academic journals such as the Journal of Political Economy, American Economic Review, Quantitative Economics, Journal of Human Resources and the Review of Economics and Statistics. In addition to his research activities, Mazumder also oversees the operations of a research center enabling access to Census and other government agency microdata on behalf of a consortium of institutions including the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, Northwestern University, the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois system.

Bhash Mazumder

Ted Mouw: The Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market Outcomes of Native Workers: Evidence using Longitudinal Data from the LEHD

Mouw’s research on social mobility focuses on factors that affect the upward mobility of low wage workers. In his paper with Arne Kalleberg, “Stepping Stone versus Dead-End Jobs: Occupational Pathways out of Working Poverty in the United States, 1996-2012”, he uses data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to test whether the accumulation of task-specific skills increases the rate of upward mobility for low-wage workers.

Ted Mouw

Chang-Tai Hsieh: Industrial Revolution in Services

Chang-Tai Hsieh conducts research on growth and development. Hsieh has published several papers in top economic journals, including “The Life-Cycle of Plants in India and Mexico,” in the Quarterly Journal of Economics; "Misallocation and Manufacturing TFP in China and India," in the Quarterly Journal of Economics; "Relative Prices and Relative Prosperity," in the American Economic Review; "Can Free Entry be Inefficient? Fixed Commissions and Social Waste in the Real Estate Industry," in the Journal of Political Economy; and "What Explains the Industrial Revolution in East Asia? Evidence from the Factor Markets," in the American Economic Review. Hsieh has been a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Banks of San Francisco, New York, and Minneapolis, as well as the World Bank's Development Economics Group and the Economic Planning Agency in Japan.

Chang-Tai Hsieh

Matthias Kehrig: The Micro-Level Anatomy of the Labor Share Decline

Matthias Kehrig is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Duke. His Working Paper "The Micro-Level Anatomy of the Labor Share Decline" (with Nicolas Vincent), November 2018. The aggregate labor share decline is overwhelmingly driven by reallocation of value added to establishments with a low and declining labor share.

Matthias Kehrig

Workshop organized by the TRDC and the Social Science Research Institute, with support from the Vice Provost for Interdisciplinary Studies.
For more information about the workshop or the TRDC email the director gale.boyd@duke.edu